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Which Truck Bed Liner is best? Let's find out!






You hello again in this fun project, I'm going to show you how simple it is to fiberglass the inside of your van or truck. Not only does it make the inside of your vehicle look good. It also makes it nice to work in easy to clean and stops the wooden floor bed rotting and chipping up later with water damage. Not only that, but it resists damage from everyday impacts like dropping kids and objects on it, as well as more deliberate, sustained abuse. As long as you don't go, absolutely mental the tough top coat, also resists cuts and scrapes and sharp objects which, although you won't be deliberately trying to cut it, does get replicated through everyday activity like sliding, classifying or concrete rubble into the back. For instance, what's more, if it does get scratched up, you can simply send it down in years to come and apply another layer of topcoat and off you go again, I'm going to show you how to fire glass the floor of a small van like this, with A complicated shape and later on a large panel truck with a bigger area, but a more simple shape. Let'S get started. This is the interior of the first vehicle we will tackle. In this case of the Volvo van and I know the interior plywood looks dirty and oil soaked because it was, I was doing this as a favor for a friend and rather than realigning the van with either new OS b3 sterling board or plywood. He decreased it with expensive solvents and a jet washer, and it literally took a week to dry afterwards. So if you think you know, following this project, I'd recommend that you start off with new sandy plywood or OS b3 sterling board instead, which the fiberglass will really want to stick to. The first thing I'm going to do is roll out my chalk, strong matting into the rear for marking and cutting. Now I can't quite remember now, but this is: are the 300 or 450 grams in weight either will do it really doesn't matter now? I'Ve moved it to the left hand, side of the van and I'm just fitting it the same way. You would a carpet it marks and cuts easily with a decent carpentry pencil and some scissors complicated curves are easy to cut into chop strong matting, as are any cutouts for the steps here. I'Ve rolled out another length ensuring there's an overlap of about 50 millimetres, and the two feathered edges should help make this hard to see later. With that done, I've effectively laid a fitted. Carpeted CSN awaited anything down that may blow about with anything. I could get my hands on at the time and we're now ready to get started. What I'm going to do now is mix some fiberglass resin and rather than showing you that at the moment, I'll make that video available separately at the end of the video, the icons and in the description bar. If you want to take a look with the resin mixed, we can start laminating the floor down and for that we're just going to need three simple tools: a fin roller, a small hand, roll of 100 to 150 millimeters will be fine and a cheap, disposable two-inch Brush in this method of fiberglassing we're just going to pour the resin onto the surface of the mat, spread it around and push it through the matting. The fastest tool for this is a resin roller and a small roller like this moves the resin around quickly and quite accurately, to when the resin is sitting just under the surface of the matting. The amount is correct for dry spots, just add more resin and move it around again, pushing it through the matting with the roller to get to the edges. Pour some more resin near the dry spots load it onto the brush and paint it into the details. Any pools of resin left over at the end could be moved into the dry matting with the roller. In a moment if you like, you can also work from the book it with the brush directly, but it does tend to drip resin about a bit. This way. A jabbing motion with the bush also helps to tamp down any matting into the resin underneath and knock out any air bubbles as well. Now it's just a matter of repeating the process on the other side of the van, and at that point I reckon we've covered approximately a square meter. So let's pick up the fin consolidating roller and push any trapped air out of the matting, so that we have a nice contact with the timber underneath. The reason I'm using a vertically thinned roll-up, rather than a horizontal paddle roller, is just to keep the flicking of resin to a minimum. Traditional paddle rollers can be a bit messy when working in cramped spaces like this. If you see any dry bits or lifts, don't be afraid to go back in with the brush or roll up to flatten anything out that may be picking up. All I'm going to do now is work backwards until I run out of resin and then mix up a fresh batch in the same bucket, just remember not to mix more than you can work with at one time you can always mix more every time you move Backwards, you can pick up one of your ballast items, move it backwards and keep working towards the rear, simple in no time at all, you'll find yourself right at the back. Tidying up the edges near the rear doors drying times will vary depending on how much hardener you've put in the resin and how hot the weather is. Typically, though, if you get everything right, you should be able to climb back into the van to are the Sun down any high spots or require color coats in about an hour here. I'Ve already mixed the color coat and again you can find instructions on how to mix the color coat in the links I mentioned earlier. Well, I'm doing here for the color coat is painting on some flat roof top coats with a fresh two inch brush, and I always put the minimum 2 % catalyst in the top coat to allow myself plenty of time to cut in around all the edges. First, as you can see, all I'm doing really is painting the details that the roller will struggle to reach. When we finish the floor in a moment now, you may have noticed that the plywood walls and some panels have also been fiberglassed, because those are relatively low impact areas. All I've done is painted them in the same manner as the floor. I haven't used any matting on the walls, just some light gray, roofing top coat and again it's remarkably hard wearing with the cutting in done. You can pour some puddles of top coats onto the floor and roller them out our farm working with about a mugful at a time works. Well, what you're looking for is a coverage of about one millimeter in depth in a nice, even coating, so you're not aquaplaning. On too much top coat or skimping, soda too becomes hard work or the matting is too visible and there you go done in a few hours. You can put things on it in 24 hours. It will be ready for work, but as long as you're gentle and in 48 hours, it should provide years of hard-working service for bigger vans or trucks. Where you have more space, you can use a similar technique to fiberglassing a flat roof. So if you're looking for a gentle introduction to working with other glass flat roofs, this could be for you, as you can see, a brand new exterior grade, plywood tongue-and-groove floor has already been laid. So all we have to do is fiberglass it, and the first thing to do is pre-cut the CSM ready for fitting in a moment just make sure you store them somewhere, nice and clean, whether it easy to pick up in order as you need them here are The two main tools we will be using to lay this fiberglass laminate an on each resin roller and a knowledge consolidating roller. And if we take a closer look at the consolidating roller you'll, see that it's a horizontal thinned roller but with vertical grooves cut into it. Again, this is for removing air bubbles from the CSM, with the minimum flicking and splashing with the resin already mixed, the CSM matting has been rolled up into position and weighted down so that it can be rolled into the resin in a moment. This is just now a matter of wetting the floor out with resin without missing any of the dry spots. Even on a larger van like this, I wouldn't mix more than five liters of resin at a time and on warm days, make sure that you allow yourself about fifteen to twenty minutes of time to work with it. The catalyst and temperature drying chart is on the side of your resin, so have a look at that, compare it with how warm it is and mix accordingly, when most of the matting is tapped down into place and not going to blow away wet out. The other end and stick that down too with that done it's time to top up the surface layer, so you can pour out a puddle and roll it in like me, or you can give your roller into the bucket and roll it in whichever you find easier Again, with that run done, and the reading sitting just underneath the CSN it's time to break out the consolidating roller to remove any trapped air and push the matting firmly into the resin and the timber the life. You should now not only see the matting being pushed down, but if you listen, you can hear an audio change to. It will actually start to sound firmer as the air bubbles pop out and come to the surface. If you see any lifts or dry spots on the edges, don't be afraid to gumming again with the two inch brush using a stippling motion or use a roller, if you have to once you're happy with that, it's time to wet out the floor again in preparation For in run, your roller should now be fully wet, which does help speed things up a bit now, because you only have two outside edges to worry about. The CSM can usually be gently placed onto the floor directly for roll number. Two, a firm push or pull here, or there should straighten it up, just make sure that you've allowed 50 millimeters of overlap onto the existing laminate. It'S back on with another layer of resin straight over the top and pushing it through the matting until you're happy everything is nice and even in comes the consolidating roller once more, which up until now has been submerged in a small bucket of acetone between uses. This just helps to stop the resin drying onto the roller and fouling it off when not in use when you need it again, just lift it out of the acetone, then shake or spin off any residue and carry on using it. Now repeat, this process until you've worked your way once again right to the rear doors and with a two-man team like this. That shouldn't take very long at all now's a good time to clean up any tools like the consolidating roller, with acetone ready for use on another job later on. Hopefully, you now have a nice finish like this one, but if any bits and bobs do stick or they're easy enough to sun flap once the floor is hard enough to poke your thumbnail into without it feeling spongy. Now it's just a matter of cutting in around the edges of the van in the same way as the last video, even in van of this size, the initial small mix of say, half a liter to a litre. Maximum will comfortably color up the edges, and I have guides for coverage for both resin and topcoat available on the website. If you want to take a look at that, where you can also find links to fiberglass supplies and kits if you need them or an important step when climbing in and out of the van and onto your fresh fiberglass, is to stop contamination by dirty shoes. And this sheeting allows me to keep my feet clean and there it is done. There'S two different vans. Fiberglass stand ready for work. Well. That brings this video to a close. I hope you found it interesting or useful. The links available here are also in the I cards and the description. If you fancy something totally different, why not check out my other youtube channel called brain fo, which has small form projects just for entertainment, don't forget to Like subscribe or share thanks for watching you
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